The Tale of Ragnar’s Sons – Translation by Peter Tunstall

© 2005 Peter Tunstall

1. King Ragnar

After the death of King Ring, his son Ragnar came to power in Sweden and Denmark. Then many kings came to the kingdom and seized land. And because he was a young man, they thought he would also be unfit for decision making or governing the country. There was a jarl in West Gautland who was called Herraud. He was a vassal of King Ragnar. He was the wisest man there was and a great warrior. He had a daughter, who was called Thora Hart-of-the-Town. She was the fairest of all women that the king had heard tell of.

The jarl, her father, had given her a baby snake for a present one morning. To begin with, she kept it in a box. But in time, this snake got so big that it coiled right round the bower and bit its own tail. It grew so fierce then that no one dared come near the bower, except her servants and those who fed it, and it ate an ox a day. Folk were very scared, and they could see that it would do great harm, so big and fierce had it become. The jarl made this solemn vow at the bragarfull, the ceremony of the chief’s cup, that he would give his daughter Thora in marriage to none but the man who could kill that snake, or who dared go and talk with her there in front of the snake.

And when King Ragnar hears this news, he goes to West Gautland. And when he had just a little way to go to the jarl’s dwelling, he donned shaggy clothes: trousers and a cloak with sleeves and hood. These clothes were treated with sand and tar, and he took in his hand a great spear, and had a sword on his belt, and in this way he left his men and walked alone to the jarl’s dwelling and Thora’s bower. And as soon as the snake saw that a stranger had come, it reared up and blew poison at him. But he thrust his shield at it and went bravely towards it and pierced its heart with his spear. Then he drew his sword and cut off the serpent’s head. And it turned out just as it says in the Saga of King Ragnar: he married Thora Hart-of-the-Town.

And afterwards he went to war and liberated the whole kingdom. He had two sons with Thora, one called Eirik, the other Agnar. And when they were a few years old, Thora takes sick and she died. After that, Ragnar married Aslaug, whom some call Randalin, the daughter of Sigurd Fafnir’s Bane and Brynhild Budli’s daughter. They had four sons. Ivar Boneless was the eldest, then Bjorn Ironside, then Hvitserk, then Sigurd. There was a mark is his eye, as if a snake lay around the pupil, and that’s why he was called Sigurd Snake-in-Eye.

2. The Death of Ragnar’s Elder Sons

Now when Ragnar’s sons were fully grown, they went raiding far and wide. The brothers Eirek and Agnar were second in rank after Ragnar, and Ivar third with his younger brothers, and he was the leader because he was very clever. They conquered Zealand and Reidgotaland, Gotland, and Öland and all the smaller islands in the sea. Then Ivar set himself up at Lejre in Zealand with his younger brothers, but that went against the will of King Ragnar. His sons all went warring, because they didn’t want to be any less famous than their father the king.

King Ragnar wasn’t too pleased about this, that his sons had turned against him and taken his tributary lands against his will. He set up a man called Eystein Beli as king over Upper Sweden, and told him to hold the realm for him and guard it from his sons, if they laid claim to it.

One summer, when King Ragnar had gone east over the Baltic with his army, his sons Eirik and Agnar came to Sweden and brought their ships into Lake Mälaren. Then they sent word to King Eystein in Uppsala, telling him to come to them. And when they met, Eirik said that he wanted Eystein to govern Sweden under the brothers, and adds that he wants to marry Eystein’s daughter Borghild, and says that then they’ll be well able to hold the kingdom against King Ragnar. Eystein tells them that he wants to consult the Swedish chieftains, so with that they part. And when King Eystein raised this matter, the chieftains were all of one mind: to defend the land from Ragnar’s sons. And they bring together now an overwhelming host, and King Eystein marches against Ragnar’s sons. And when they clash, a great battle ensues and Lodbrok’s sons are overwhelmed by superior numbers, and their troops fall in such numbers that hardly any were left standing. Then Agnar fell too, and Eirik was captured.

King Eystein offered peace to Eirik and as much of the wealth of Uppsala as he wanted in compensation for his brother Agnar, and, along with that, he could have his daughter Borghild, just as he’d asked. Eirik didn’t want monetary compensation, and he didn’t want the king’s daughter, and he says he doesn’t want to live after such a defeat as he’s just had, but this, he said, this is what he would accept: to choose for himself the day of his death. And since King Eystein couldn’t get any settlement out of Eirik, he agreed to that.

Eirik asked them to catch him from below on spear-points and so lift him up above all the slain. Then chanted Eirik:

“Don’t care, cur, to hear you,
killer if you offer;
(Eystein, they say, slew Agnar)
I don’t want your daughter.
To mourn me I’ve no mother;
make haste, hey!, impale me.
I’ll die over host hoisted,
highest o’er the slaughter.”

And before he was lifted up on the spears, he saw a man riding hard. Then he said:

“Send word to my slender
sweet stepmother, greet her:
(my forays east are ended)
say all my rings are hers.
Great will grow their anger
when they get to know it,
when she brings her bounteous
boys news of my demise.”

Now it was done, just as he’d said: Eirik was raised up on the spear-points, and he died thus, up above the slain.

And when word of this reaches Aslaug in Zealand, she goes at once to see her sons and tells them the news. Bjorn and Hvitserk were playing tafl, and Sigurd was stood in front. Then said Aslaug:

“I doubt, if they’d made it,
and you lot had fallen,
(with loved ones not living)
they’d let you go forgotten
I say and make no secret
six whole months sans vengeance,
if Eirik lived, and Agnar–
I who never bore them.”

Then Sigurd Snake-in-Eye answered:

“In three weeks we’ll be through with
(if that grieves you, mother)
(long the way that waits us)
war-readying of levies.
Eystein’s rule’s soon over
–even if he offers
payments big and brazen–
if our blades prove true then.

Then said Bjorn Ironside:

“Heart will hold, heroic,
in a hawk-keen torso:
doughty, daring, though I
don’t shout out about it,
nor snakes nor beady serpents
sit in my eyes spiralled.
Those men made me merry:
your stepsons I remember.”

Then answered Hvitserk:

“Let’s plan, before vowing,
how vengeance might be managed,
various vile torments
devise for Agnar’s killer;
heave hulls onto billows,
hew ice aside, slice it.
Let’s see who’s sloop’s scrambled,
schooners to sea, soonest.

Then Ivar Boneless said:

“Pluck you have in plenty
and pith as well with it:
let’s trust too you’re stubborn,
as tough heads are needed.
I’m borne before my fighters
forward though I’m boneless,
I have hands for vengeance,
though hardly strength in either.”

After that, Ragnar’s sons mustered an overwhelming army. And when they were ready, they went with a fleet to Sweden, while Queen Aslaug goes overland with fifteen hundred knights, and that host was well equipped. She wore armour herself and commanded the army, and they called her Randalin, and they meet up in Sweden and plunder and burn wherever they go.

King Eystein hears word of this and raises an army against them, with every man of fighting age who was in his realm. And when they met, a mighty battle ensued, and Lodbrok’s sons had the victory, and King Eystein fell, and news of this battle spreads far and wide, and very famous it becomes.

Out campaigning, King Ragnar hears of it, and he’s less than happy with his sons, as they’d taken revenge without waiting for him. And when he comes home to his realm, he says to Aslaug that he’ll do deeds no less famous than his sons have done. “I’ve now won back almost all the lands that my forebears held, but not England. And that’s why I’ve now had twoknorrs1 made at Lidum in Vestfold”–his kingdom reached all the way to Dovrefjell and Lindesnes.

Aslaug answered, “You could have had many longships2 made for the price of these knorrs. And besides, you know that big ships are no good for going to England, with all the streams and shallows there, and this is not well thought out.”

But all the same, King Ragnar goes west to England in these knorrs with five hundred men and both ships are wrecked in England, but Ragnar himself and all his crew came safely ashore. He takes now to harrying wherever he goes.

3. The Fall of Ragnar and the Vengeance of his Sons

At that time, there was a king called Ella ruling over Northumbria in England. And when he learns that raiders have come to his kingdom, he musters a mighty force and marches against Ragnar with an overwhelming host, and hard and terrible battle ensues. King Ragnar was clad in the silken jacket Aslaug had given him at their parting. But as the defending army was so big that nothing could withstand them, so almost all his men were killed, but he himself charged four times through the ranks of King Ella, and iron just glanced off his silk shirt. Finally he was taken captive and put in a snake-pit, but the snakes wouldn’t come near him. King Ella had seen during the day, as they fought, that iron didn’t bite him, and now the snakes won’t harm him. So he had him stripped of the clothes that he’d been wearing on the day, and at once snakes were hanging off him on all sides, and he left his life there with much courage.

And when the sons of King Ragnar hear this news, they head west to England and fight with King Ella. But since Ivar wouldn’t fight, nor his men, and moreover the English army was immense, they were defeated and fled to their ships and home to Denmark, leaving it at that.

But Ivar stayed in England and went to see King Ella and asked to be compensated for his father. And because King Ella had seen that Ivar didn’t want to fight alongside his brothers, he took this for a genuine offer of peace. Ivar asked the king to give him in compensation as much land as he could cover with the biggest old bull-hide he could find, because, he says, he can’t very well go home in peace to his brothers if he doesn’t get anything. This all seemed above board to Ella and they agree to these terms. Ivar now takes a fresh supple bull-skin and has it stretched out as thin as can be. And then he has the hide sliced into the finest string, and he then splits the flesh-side from the hair-side for himself. Then he has it pulled around a flat stretch of land and marked out foundations. He builds strong city walls, and that town is now called York. He makes alliances with all the people of the country and especially with the leaders, and eventually all the chiefs around pledged loyalty to him and his brothers.

Then he sends word to his brothers and says it’s more likely they’ll be able to avenge their father now if they come with an army to England. And when they hear that, they order out the army and make for England. And as soon as Ivar learns they’re on their way, he goes to King Ella and says that he doesn’t want to keep such news a secret, but he can’t really fight against his own brothers; nevertheless he’ll go and talk to them and try to make peace. The king agrees. Ivar goes to meet his brothers and incites them to avenge their father, and then goes back to King Ella and says that they’re so savage and crazed with fury that they want to fight no matter what. As far as the king can see, Ivar is acting with the utmost faith. Now Ella goes against the bothers with his army.

But when they clash, a good many leaders leave the king and go over to Ivar. The king was outnumbered then, so that the greater part of his forces fell, but he himself was taken captive. Ivar and the brothers now recall how their father was tortured. They now had the eagle cut in Ella’s back, then all his ribs severed from the backbone with a sword, so that his lungs were pulled out. As Sighvat says in the poem Knutsdrapa:

“Ivar, he who
held court at York,
had eagle hacked
in Ella’s back.”

After this battle, Ivar made himself king over that part of England which his forbears had owned before him. He had two brothers born out of wedlock, one called Yngvar, the other Husto. They tortured King Edmund the Saint on Ivar’s orders, and then he took his kingdom.

The sons of Lodbrok went raiding in many lands: England, Wales, France and out over Lombardy. But it’s said the furthest they got was when they took the town of Luni. And one time they thought of going to Rome and taking that. And their warrings have become the most famous in all the northlands where Norse is spoken. And when they come back to their realm in Denmark, they shared out the lands between them. Bjorn Ironside got Uppsala and central Sweden and all the lands that belong to that, and it’s told that Sigurd Snake-in-Eye had Zealand and Skåne and Halland, and Oslo Fjord, and Agder as far as Lindesnes and a good portion of the Norwegian Uplands, while Hvitserk had Reidgotaland and Wendland.

Sigurd Snake-in-Eye married Blaeja, the daughter of King Ella. Their son was Knut, who was called Horda-Knut, who succeeded his father in Zealand, Skåne and Halland, but Oslo Fjord broke away from his rule. Gorm was his son. He was named after his foster father, the son of Knut the Foundling. He governed all the lands of Ragnar’s sons while they were away at war. Gorm Knutsson was the biggest of men and the strongest and the most impressive in every respect, but he wasn’t as wise as his forebears had been.

4. Of King Gorm

Gorm took the kingship after his father. He married Thyri, who was called Denmark’s Saviour, daughter of Klakk-Harald, who was king in Jutland. But when Harald died, Gorm took all of Harald’s realm under his rule too. King Gorm went with his host over the whole of Jutland and abolished all the petty kings as far south as the River Schlei, and thus seized much of Wendland, and he fought great battles against the Saxons and became a mighty king. He had two sons. The eldest was called Knut, and the younger one Harald. Knut was the most handsome man ever seen. The king loved him above any other man, and so did all the people. He was called The Love of the Danes. Harald resembled his mother’s kin and his mother loved him no less than Knut.

Ivar the Boneless was king in England for a long time. He had no children, because of the way he was: with no lust or love–but he wasn’t short of cunning and cruelty. And he died of old-age in England and was buried there. Then all Ragnar’s sons were dead. After Ivar, Adalmund, the son of Saint Edmund’s brother, took the kingship in England and converted large parts of it to Christianity. He took tribute from Northumbria, because that was heathen. His son, Adalbrigt, ruled after him. He was a good king and lived to an old age.

Towards the end of his time, a Danish army came to England, and the leaders of the army were Knut and Harald, the sons of King Gorm. They seized large parts of the kingdom in Northumbria, which Ivar had owned. King Adalbrigt marched against them and they fought north of Cleveland, and a great many Danes fell there. And a little later, the Danes went up to Scarborough and fought there and won. Then they marched south to York and the whole populous accepted their rule, and they had no fear. And one day, when the weather was hot, the men went bathing in the sea. And as the king’s sons were also swimming between the ships, some men rushed down from the land and shot at them. Knut was mortally wounded with an arrow, and they took the body and carried it out to the ship. And when the English hear that, they gather their forces, so that the Danes can’t get ashore, due to the Englishmen gathered there. So after that they go back home to Denmark.

King Gorm was in Jutland at the time. And when he heard these tidings, he collapsed and he died of grief at the same hour the following day. Then Harald, his son, ruled in Denmark. He was the first of his kin to take the faith and be baptised.

5. The Fall of Sigurd Hart

Sigurd Snake-in-Eye and Bjorn Ironside and Hvitserk had raided widely in France. Then Bjorn headed back home to his kingdom. After that, the Emperor Arnulf fought with the brothers, and a hundred thousand Danes and Norwegians fell there. There also fell Sigurd Snake-in-Eye, and Gudrod was the name of another king who fell there. He was the son of Olaf, the son of Ring, the son of Ingjald, the son of Ingi, the son of Ring, after whom Ringerike in Norway is known. Ring was the son of Dag and Thora Mother-of-Drengs.3 They had nine sons, and the Dagling dynasty comes from them.

Helgi Hvassi, the Sharp, was the name of Gudrod’s brother. He escaped from the battle with the standard of Sigurd Snake-in-Eye, and his sword and shield. He went home to Demark with his own forces and there found Aslaug, Sigurd’s mother, and told her the tidings. Then Aslaug spoke a verse:

“Sad sit the corpse-stalkers,
slaverers after cadavers:
the slain-craver, raven–
what a shame!–forsaken
by namesake of Sigurd;
in vain now they’re waiting.
Too soon from life Lord Odin
let such a hero go.”

But because Horda-Knut was young, Helgi stayed with Aslaug for a long time as protector of the land. Sigurd and Blaeja had a daughter. She was Horda-Knut’s twin. Aslaug gave her own name to her and brought her up then and fostered her. Afterwards she married Helgi Hvassi. Their son was Sigurd Hart. Of all the men ever seen, he was the fairest, and the biggest, and the strongest. They were the same age, Gorm Knutsson and Sigurd Hart.

When Sigurd was twelve, he killed the berserk Hildibrand in a duel, and he single-handedly slew twelve men in that fight. After that Klakk-Harald gave him his daughter, who was called Ingibjorg. They had two children: Gudthorm and Ragnhild.

Then Sigurd learnt that King Frodi, his father’s brother, was dead. He went north to Norway and became king over Ringerike, his inheritance. There is a long story told of him, as he did all manner of mighty deeds.

But it’s said of his passing, that he rode out hunting in the wilderness, as was his custom, and Haki Hadaberserk came at him with thirty fully armed men and they fought with him. Sigurd fell there, after first killing twelve men, but King Haki had lost his right hand and received three other wounds besides. Afterwards Haki and his men rode to Ringerike, to Stein, where Sigurd’s dwelling was, and took away Ragnhild his daughter, and his son Gudthorm, and plenty of goods too, and carried them off home with him to Hadeland. And soon after that, he had a great feast prepared and meant to celebrate his wedding, but it was put off because his wounds weren’t healing. Ragnhild was fifteen years old then, and Gudthorm fourteen. Autumn passed, and Haki was laid up with his wounds till Yule.

At this time, King Halfdan the Black was staying at his estate in Hedmark. He sent Harek Gand with a hundred and twenty men, and they marched over the frozen Lake Mjøsa to Hadeland one night and came the next morning to King Haki’s home and seized all the doors of the hall where the retainers were sleeping. And then they went to King Haki’s bedroom and took Ragnhild and Gudthorm, her brother, and all the treasure that was there, and carry it off with them. They burnt all the retainers in their hall and then leave. But King Haki got up and got dressed and went after them for a while. But when he came to the ice, he turned down his sword-hilt to the ground and fell on the point and met his death there, and he’s buried on the bank of the lake.

King Halfdan saw them coming over the ice with a covered wagon and guessed their mission had gone exactly as he wished. He had a message sent then to all the settlements and invited to all the important people in Hedmark to a big feast that very day. There he celebrated his wedding to Ragnhild, and they lived together for many years after. Their son was King Harald the Fine-Haired, who was first to become sole ruler over the whole of Norway.

***

 

Ragnar “Lodbrok” “Hairy Britches” Sigurdsson, King of Denmark & Norway (c.765 – 845) MP 100

 

Nicknames:
“Regner”, “Lodbrog”, “”Hairy-Breeks””, “Sigurdsson”, “Lodbrok”, “Loðbrók”, “Ragnar “Lodbrok” /Sigurdsson/”, “/Lodbrok/”, “King of Dacia (Denmark)”, “‘Lodbrok'”, “Lodbrok (Hairy Breeches)”, “Hairy-Breeks”, “”Lodbrok””, “King of Denmark”, “Ragnar “Hairy-Breeks””, “King of Sweden”, “Loth…”

Birthplace:
Uppsala, Sweden

Death:
Died 845 in Snake Pit, Northumberland, , England

Occupation:
Pirate, raider and legendary Danish King, Konge/viking, Vikingakung, konge i Sverige og Danmark, King of Denmark and Sweden, Roi des Danois et de Lethra, King of Denmark/Sweden, Vikingkonge etter sagaen, død etter 845, konge, Roi, de Lethra, Konge, Jarl

 

Matching family tree profiles for Ragnar “Lodbrok” Sigurdsson

About Ragnar “Lodbrok” “Hairy Britches” Sigurdsson, King of Denmark & Norway

Ragnar Lodbrok is a fictional person made up of 2-5 different persons in the different stories that talks about him. For more information (Some in English some in Norwegian): http://www.scangen.se/medieval/ragnar.htm (English)http://no.wikisource.org/wiki/Det_norske_Folks_Historie/1/52 (Norwegian written as early as 1853!)

(Remi Pedersen)

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Lodbrok “Hairy Britches” Sigurdsson, King of Denmark & Norway

⚪ c765 ⚫ c845

Parents: ♂ Sigurd Ring and ♀ Alfhild Gandolfsdottir

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Ragnar was according to the sagas married to or had children with five women, and first wife according toVölsungasaga was semi-legendary female Danish viking and shieldmaiden Lathgertha, and they had the son:

His second wife was Åslaug Sigurdsdatter (also called Kråka) and they had the children:

  1. Ubbe Ragnarsson (uncertain mother, could be the son of a nameless wife)

The third wife was Tora Borgarhjort …

  1. Björn «Ironside» Järnsida

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Relationships:

⚭1 Lathgertha

  • ♂ Fridleiv Ragnarsson
  • ♂ Gudrødr of Lochlainn (Mother assumed)

⚭2 Åslaug Kråka Sigurdsdatter (Randalin)

  1. ♀ Ragnhild Ragnarsdottir
  2. ♀ Alof Ragnarsdottir

⚭3 Tora

  1. ♂ Eiríkr ?
  2. ♂ Agnar
  3. ♂ Rathbarth Ragnarsson
  4. ♂ Dunyat Ragnarsson,

⚭4 Svanloga

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  • Rognvald Ragnarsson;
  • Olof
  • Ragnvald
  • Dtr of King Ragnar of Skjoldung;
  • Gudrødr of Lochlainn;

Brother of

  • N Of “Ring” Sigurdsdatter (n.n.);
  • RING II SIGURDSSON KING OF DENMARK;
  • Eysteinn Halfdansson;
  • Gudrod Halfdansson;
  • Sineus; Trouvor (le Fidèle);
  • Ring
  • Ragnhilde Sigurdsdottir

Notes/Assumptions/Decisions:

  • According to xx Tora was the mother of Halvdan Kvitserk Ragnarsson and Björn Ironside.
  • There is a note that Thora was also known as Aslaug or Kraka. The different online sources seem to confirm this. Could any expert on Ladbok please assist to confirm and fix if required.

Last Validated by: John Smith 22/10/2012 About me reviewed by: English John Smith 22/10/2012 English

 

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Ragnar Lodbrok (Ragnar “Hairy-Breeks”, Old Norse: Ragnarr Loðbrók) was a Norse legendary hero from the Viking Age who was thoroughly reshaped in Old Norse poetry and legendary sagas.

Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865.[citation needed] Neither really matches with what is known of him, though he may perhaps have held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

A historic Ragnar Lodbrok is held to have been an earl at the court of the Danish king Horik I (814-854), and this Ragnar participated in the Viking plunderings of Paris in 845.

A certain Reginheri attacked Paris with a fleet of 120 ships. The warriors belonging to the army of Charles the Bald, were placed to guard the monastery in St. Denis, but fled when the Danish Vikings executed their prisoners ferociously in front of their eyes.

After receiving a tribute of 7000 pounds of silver from Charles the Bald, Ragnar went back. By mysterious circumstances, many men in Ragnar’s army died during the journey and Ragnar died soon after his return.

Ragnar apparently spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. One of his favorite tactics was to attack Christian cities on church feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving.

But as the extent of his supposed realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader. By 845, he was a powerful man and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that would outshine his own achievements.

It was in 845 that he is said to have sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in what is now France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish Empire was then known. Rouen was ravaged and then Carolivenna, a mere 20 km from St. Denis. The raiders then attacked and captured Paris. The traditional date for this is 28 March, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by certain followers of the Asatru religion.

The King of West Francia, Charlemagne’s grandson Charles the Bald, paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

Later, Ragnar’s sons were to return for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for “Northmen”, as the Franks called the Scandinavians or the Nordmenn as the Norwegians called themselves (which is much more likely).

After he was done with France, and after his supposed death in 845, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the north-east coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle II of Northumbria.

Aelle’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he is alleged to have exclaimed “How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!”, referring to the vengeance he hoped his sons would wreak when they heard of his death.

Alternative versions of the story say that he landed by accident in East Anglia and there befriended King Edmund before being killed by a jealous courtier. The murderer escaped to Denmark and blamed Edmund for Lodbrok’s demise.

As he was thrown into the snake pit, Ragnar was said to have uttered his famous death song: “It gladdens me to know that Balder’s father makes ready the benches for a banquet. Soon we shall be drinking ale from the curved horns. The champion who comes into Odin’s dwelling does not lament his death. I shall not enter his hall with words of fear upon my lips. The Æsir will welcome me. Death comes without lamenting… Eager am I to depart. The Dísir summon me home, those whom Odin sends for me from the halls of the Lord of Hosts. Gladly shall I drink ale in the high-seat with the Æsir. The days of my life are ended. I laugh as I die.”

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing tafl, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Although these stories may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. His other sons, Ivar the Boneless (alias Hingwar) and Ubbe soon learned the details of their father’s death and swore that they would avenge his killing, in time-honoured Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar and Ubbe crossed the North Sea with a large army (The Great Heathen Army), sacked York, met King Aelle in battle, and captured him. He was sentenced to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn (Blood eagle), an exceedingly painful death.

They then moved south to East Anglia, on the way attacking the monasteries of Bardney, Croyland and Medeshampstede where, according to tradition, their army slew 80 monks. Eventually they captured King Edmund and had him shot by archers and beheaded. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the Danes a generation later.

He was said at one point to be married to the infamous Viking pirate Lathgertha.

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Född 765 i Uppsala. Död 845 i England.

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=Ragnar%20Lodbrok&list=&vis=

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Ragnar Sigurdsson – also known as: Lodbrok – was born about 0765 in Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden and died in 0845 in England . He was the son of King Sigrud Randversson and Alfhild Gandolfsdatter.

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsatter about 0763 while living in Denmark. Aslaug was born about 0765, lived in Denmark. She is the daughter of Sigrud “Fafnisbana” Sigmundsson and Brunhild Budlasdatter.

Children:

i. Sigurd “Snake-Eye” Ragnarsson was born about 0786 in Denmark. See #5. below.

ii. Bjorn Ragarsson was born about 0777 in Denmark.

——————–

Flourished in the 9th century

Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar’s murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar’s death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo’s legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar’s death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands’ poem Háttalykill.

____________________________________

Ragnarr Loðbrók or Ragnar Lodbrok was a semi-legendary King of Denmark and Sweden who reigned sometime in the eighth or ninth centuries. Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865. Neither matches with what we know of him, and he probably held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

Life

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Raids

He spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving. But as the extent of his realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader.

France

By 845, he was a powerful ruler, and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that outshined his own achievements.

In that year, he sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in modern France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish empire was then known.

Also in 845, Paris was captured and held ransom by a Viking raider, whom the sagas say was Ragnar Lodbrok. The traditional date for this is March 28, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by many Scandinavians. The King of West Francia, Charlemagne’s son Charles II “The Bald”, paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

England

After he was done with France, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the northeast coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle of Northumbria. Ella’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he was alleged to have exclaimed “How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!”

Legacy

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing chess, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Ragnar’s fourth son, Ivar the Boneless soon learned the details of his father’s death and swore that he would avenge his father’s killing, in time-honored Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar crossed the North Sea with a large army, met King Ella in battle, and captured him. He sentenced him to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn, an exceedingly painful death. Although this story may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. Ivor was the mastermind behind the attacks on the English mainland in the final quarter of the ninth century. He invaded East Anglia, and the following year attacked York. He was aided by the internal struggle for power in Northumbria—which he was of course responsible for by killing Ella. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the “Danes” a generation later.

Meanwhile, in France, the Vikings kept coming back for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for “Northmen”, as the Franks called the Vikings).

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsdottir, daughter of Sigurd Wolsung and Unknown

——————–

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=Ragnar%20Lodbrok&list=&vis=

——————–

  1. ID: I21817
  2. Name: Ragnar “Lodbrok” SIGURDSON
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: ABT 0750 in Uppsala, Sweden
  5. Death: 0845 in Northumberland, England (France )
  6. 6.Father: Sigurd I “Ring” b: ABT 0710 in Denmark
  7. 7.   Mother: Alfhild b: ABT 0714 in Alfheim, Norway

    8.   Marriage 1 Aslaug of Denmark SIGURDSDOTTIR b: ABT 0755 in Denmark

    9.   Flourished in the 9th century, was a Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar’s murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar’s death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo’s legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar’s death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands’ poem Háttalykill.2

Note* Other children given by Hull are: (1) female, Ragnhildir: (2) Ragnarsdottir, Alof and (3)Ragnarsson, Ubbe. He may have had a wife named Thora who MAY have been the mother of Alof.

Bjørn Ironside certainly played an important role in France. His father Ragnar Lodbrok can be identified in contemporary Frankish annals with his nickname Lodbrok translated to Hoseri (in German language Hosen), meaning fur or leather breeches. Variations are Ogier and Oschery. He operated from the Seine to the border of Spain from 840 to 851. He conquered Aquitania from the Franks, and he used Bordeaux as his stronghold for years. This conquer, one out of more, included Poitou, which in the sagas is called Peita. Saxo is saying Petiæ and that Ragnar conquered Petiæ. this is confirmed in annals. This is the district in the Loire area. In Western Europe his sons are more reported. Ragnar Lodbrok himself were operating more in East Europe

——————–

Ragnar Lodbrok was a semi-legendary King of Denmark and Sweden who reigned sometime in the eighth or ninth centuries. Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750 -794 , and others from 860 -865 . Neither jibes with what we know of him, and he probably held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865 , perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

He was probably born in modern Norway, and later became part of the ruling class in Denmark. At some point, he became king there, and later gained control of Sweden and Finland (then a part of Sweden), as well. He was given the nickname “hairy breeches” because he favored trousers made from animal skin by his wife.

He spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving. But as the extent of his realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader.

By 845 , he was a powerful ruler, and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia , the Viking Rurik . It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that outshined his own achievements.

In that year, he sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in modern France , probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish empire was then known.

Also in 845, Paris was captured and held ransom by a Viking raider, whom the sagas say was Ragnar Lodbrok. The traditional date for this is March 28 , which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by many Scandinavians. The King of West Francia, Charlemagne ’s son Charles II “The Bald”, paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin . One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

After he was done with France, he turned his attention to England . In 865 , he landed in Northumbria on the northeast coast of England. Here, it is claimed that he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Ella of Northumbria. Ella’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a snake pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he was alleged to have exclaimed “How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!”

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing chess, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Bjorn grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Ragnar’s fourth son, Ivor “the Boneless”, soon learned the details of his father’s death and swore that he would avenge his father’s death and subsequent killing, in time-honored Viking tradition. In 866 , Ivor crossed the North Sea with a large army, met King Ella in battle, and captured him. He sentenced him to die according to the custom of the “blood red eagle”, which was to cut the ribs of the victim out and the lungs removed by grasping them and spreading them over the body. He then avenged his father’s death in exactly this manner.

Although this story, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, may or may not be accurate, his death had serious consequences. Ivor was the mastermind behind the attacks on the English mainland in the final quarter of the ninth century. He invaded East Anglia, and the following year attacked York. He was aided by the internal struggle for power in Northumbria–which he was of course responsible for by killing Ella. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the “Danes” a generation later.

Meanwhile, in France, the Vikings kept coming back for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for “Northmen”, as the Franks called the Vikings).

——————–

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Ragnar Lodbrok (Ragnar “Hairy-Breeks”, Old Norse: Ragnarr Loðbrók) was a Norse legendary hero from the Viking Age who was thoroughly reshaped in Old Norse poetry and legendary sagas.

Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865.[citation needed] Neither really matches with what is known of him, though he may perhaps have held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

A historic Ragnar Lodbrok is held to have been an earl at the court of the Danish king Horik I (814-854), and this Ragnar participated in the Viking plunderings of Paris in 845.

A certain Reginheri attacked Paris with a fleet of 120 ships. The warriors belonging to the army of Charles the Bald, were placed to guard the monastery in St. Denis, but fled when the Danish Vikings executed their prisoners ferociously in front of their eyes.

After receiving a tribute of 7000 pounds of silver from Charles the Bald, Ragnar went back. By mysterious circumstances, many men in Ragnar’s army died during the journey and Ragnar died soon after his return.

Ragnar apparently spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. One of his favorite tactics was to attack Christian cities on church feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving.

But as the extent of his supposed realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader. By 845, he was a powerful man and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that would outshine his own achievements.

It was in 845 that he is said to have sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in what is now France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish Empire was then known. Rouen was ravaged and then Carolivenna, a mere 20 km from St. Denis. The raiders then attacked and captured Paris. The traditional date for this is 28 March, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by certain followers of the Asatru religion.

The King of West Francia, Charlemagne’s grandson Charles the Bald, paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

Later, Ragnar’s sons were to return for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for “Northmen”, as the Franks called the Scandinavians or the Nordmenn as the Norwegians called themselves (which is much more likely).

After he was done with France, and after his supposed death in 845, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the north-east coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle II of Northumbria.

Aelle’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he is alleged to have exclaimed “How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!”, referring to the vengeance he hoped his sons would wreak when they heard of his death.

Alternative versions of the story say that he landed by accident in East Anglia and there befriended King Edmund before being killed by a jealous courtier. The murderer escaped to Denmark and blamed Edmund for Lodbrok’s demise.

As he was thrown into the snake pit, Ragnar was said to have uttered his famous death song: “It gladdens me to know that Balder’s father makes ready the benches for a banquet. Soon we shall be drinking ale from the curved horns. The champion who comes into Odin’s dwelling does not lament his death. I shall not enter his hall with words of fear upon my lips. The Æsir will welcome me. Death comes without lamenting… Eager am I to depart. The Dísir summon me home, those whom Odin sends for me from the halls of the Lord of Hosts. Gladly shall I drink ale in the high-seat with the Æsir. The days of my life are ended. I laugh as I die.”

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing tafl, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Although these stories may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. His other sons, Ivar the Boneless (alias Hingwar) and Ubbe soon learned the details of their father’s death and swore that they would avenge his killing, in time-honoured Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar and Ubbe crossed the North Sea with a large army (The Great Heathen Army), sacked York, met King Aelle in battle, and captured him. He was sentenced to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn (Blood eagle), an exceedingly painful death.

They then moved south to East Anglia, on the way attacking the monasteries of Bardney, Croyland and Medeshampstede where, according to tradition, their army slew 80 monks. Eventually they captured King Edmund and had him shot by archers and beheaded. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the Danes a generation later.

He was said at one point to be married to the infamous Viking pirate Lathgertha.

——————–

Född 765 i Uppsala. Död 845 i England.

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=Rag…=

——————–

Ragnar Sigurdsson – also known as: Lodbrok – was born about 0765 in Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden and died in 0845 in England . He was the son of King Sigrud Randversson and Alfhild Gandolfsdatter.

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsatter about 0763 while living in Denmark. Aslaug was born about 0765, lived in Denmark. She is the daughter of Sigrud “Fafnisbana” Sigmundsson and Brunhild Budlasdatter.

Children:

i. Sigurd “Snake-Eye” Ragnarsson was born about 0786 in Denmark. See #5. below.

ii. Bjorn Ragarsson was born about 0777 in Denmark.

——————–

Flourished in the 9th century

Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar’s murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar’s death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo’s legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar’s death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands’ poem Háttalykill.

____________________________________

Ragnarr Loðbrók or Ragnar Lodbrok was a semi-legendary King of Denmark and Sweden who reigned sometime in the eighth or ninth centuries. Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865. Neither matches with what we know of him, and he probably held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

Life

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Raids

He spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving. But as the extent of his realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader.

France

By 845, he was a powerful ruler, and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that outshined his own achievements.

In that year, he sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in modern France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish empire was then known.

Also in 845, Paris was captured and held ransom by a Viking raider, whom the sagas say was Ragnar Lodbrok. The traditional date for this is March 28, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by many Scandinavians. The King of West Francia, Charlemagne’s son Charles II “The Bald”, paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

England

After he was done with France, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the northeast coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle of Northumbria. Ella’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he was alleged to have exclaimed “How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!”

Legacy

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing chess, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Ragnar’s fourth son, Ivar the Boneless soon learned the details of his father’s death and swore that he would avenge his father’s killing, in time-honored Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar crossed the North Sea with a large army, met King Ella in battle, and captured him. He sentenced him to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn, an exceedingly painful death. Although this story may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. Ivor was the mastermind behind the attacks on the English mainland in the final quarter of the ninth century. He invaded East Anglia, and the following year attacked York. He was aided by the internal struggle for power in Northumbria—which he was of course responsible for by killing Ella. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the “Danes” a generation later.

Meanwhile, in France, the Vikings kept coming back for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for “Northmen”, as the Franks called the Vikings).

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsdottir, daughter of Sigurd Wolsung and Unknown

——————–

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=Rag…=

——————–

  1. ID: I21817
  2. Name: Ragnar “Lodbrok” SIGURDSON
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: ABT 0750 in Uppsala, Sweden
  5. Death: 0845 in Northumberland, England (France )
  6. Note:

Note: Notes:

See Snorre’s Saga and the Icelandic Landnamobok (Book ofSettlment).

Many historians regard much of the genealogy at this point to bepurely

legendary, or even mythical.

Subject: Ragnar LothbrokFrom: sbald@auburn.campus.mci.net(Stewart Baldwin)Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996996 20:46:28 GMTSometimein 1995 (I don’t have the date), I posted an earlier versionofthe articlecle below in answer to an item asking whether or notRagnarLothbrok existed. Since Anders Berg hass asked me if hecan put thisitem on his web page, I decided to update it andsubmit it again, andssolicit comments, before making any finalcorrections. The section”Could RAGNALL and LOTHBROK haveve beenthe same person?” is new, andwas not in last year’s posting. Therest is essentially the ssame aslast year’s version, with someminor changes.Any comments?StewartBaldwin————————————————WasRAGNAR LOTHBROK historical?One of the things that makes this adif difficult question to discuss isthat the question “WasRagnar Lothbrok historical?” is itselfsomemewhat ambiguous.Thus, before the question can be discussed, thequestion has tofirst be more cleearly defined. To mention twooppositeextremes, a skeptic could ask whether or not everything whicchissaid about the character of Ragnar Lothbrok ishistoricallyaccurate, observe that the answer i is certainly”no”, and then claimvictory. At the other extreme, a proponentof a historical RagnaarLothbrok could ask if a Viking by thename of Ragnar ever existed,point out that a Viking having g thecorrect name (“Reginheri”) appearsin the Frankish annals, andclaim that Ragnar Lothbrok wass thereforehistorical. Neither ofthese two extremes is acceptable in a seriousargument on thesububject, so I will discuss the subject from thefollowingmiddle ground. The criteria which I will uuse are that inorderfor Ragnar Lothbrok to be considered as historical, thereshouldbe a historicacally documented person of that name whoactuallyperformed a significant number of the deeds attribbutedto thelegendary Ragnar Lothbrok. I think these are reasonablecriteria, andthe remainder ofof this discussion is based onthese principles. Now,to answer the question: No, RagnarLothbrok does not appear to be ahistorical figure, based on theabove criteria. I will give somecomments a as to why I havethis opinion, and then mention some readingmaterial for thosewho want more.RAGNAGNARThe contemporary historical records ofthe ninth century (when RagnarLothbrok supposedly lived)ed) showonly one Viking of the correct name, aViking named “Reginheri”(a Latin form equivalent too the name Ragnar)in France WHO DIEDIN THE YEAR 845, according to the contemporaryFrankish annals.s.The emphasized words in the previous sentence areoftenconveninetly overlooked by those who wissh to use Reginheri asahistorical prototype for Ragnar Lothbrok. Since Reginheri diedinFrance inin the year 845, he cannot have participated in thelaterevents which form the principal part of tthe legendaryRagnarLothbrok’s exploits. In addition, there is no goodevidence thatReginheri was s the father of any of theindividuals who later came tobe regarded as sons of RagnarLothbrok. Thhus, Reginheri fails tosatisfy the criterionmentioned above. No other historical Norsemannamed RaRagnar isknown for the appropriate time period.LOTHBROKNo contemporaryrecord gives this name, and and it is significant thatwhen thename finally does make it appearance in the records 200yearslalater, it stands alone. (Ari, writing in the twelfthcentury, was thefirst known writer to make Raagnar and Lothbrokthe same person.) Thename first appears (as “Lothbroc”) in”Gesta Normannorum DDucum”, byWilliam of Jumieges, writing about1070, in which Lothbroc is calledhe father of Bjorn IrIronside.(A Viking named Bjorn is verified by thecontemporary chronicles,but without the nicknamme.) Adam of Bremen,writing soonafterward, called Ivar the son of “Lodparchus”. Besidesthe factt that this Lothbrok is not attested in any of thecontemporarysources, there seems to be another pproblem, andthat is that the name(“Lothbroka”) appears to be a women’s name.See the article onRaRagnars saga” by Rory McTurk in “MedievalScandinavia: anencyclopedia” (New York and London, 1993)). Ifthis argument based onphilology is correct, then thisLothbrok(a), if historical at all,woululd be a women, andclearly not identical with the legendary RagnarrLothbrok. (I donot have the bbackground in linguistics to commentfurther onthis gender argument.)RAGNALLThe “Fragmentary Annalsnnals ofIreland” (edited and translated by Joan N.Radner, Dublin, 1978,formerly called “Three Fraagments”) has an itemof interest whichhas frequently been pointed out as possibly relatingto the llegend of Ragnar Lothbrok. In it, a certain Ragnall(Rognvald)son of Alpdan (Halfdan), king of Noorway, ismentioned, and hisexploits prior to the fall of York to theDanes are given, in acontext t in which it is at least arguablethat Ragnall and RagnarLothbrok were the same person. Therearee two problem with thisinterpretation. First, Ragnar andRagnall are not the same name, eventhoughgh they look similar.Second, and more important, the FragmentaryAnnals are themselvesnot a conteemporary source, and there is goodreason to besuspicious about them. However, even if we were to allowthatthe events given there are historical (a concession whichmanyhistorians would be unwilllling to make), and then concedefurther thatthese events form the basis of the Ragnar legend,thenn we would stillhave that the person on whom the legend wasbased did not have theright name.Could uld RAGNALL and LOTHBROKhave been the same person?We have already seen that the onlyhistorically y attested Ragnar(Reginheri) cannot reasonably beregarded as a historical prototypefor Ragnar Loththbrok. Thus,it appears that the best attempt to arguefor a historical RagnarLothbrok is to proppose (as has been done onnumerous occasions)that Ragnall and Lothbrok were both the sameperson, anand thenassume that the similar (but different) names Ragnalland Ragnarwere accidently confused. Thus, let us see whatassumptions areneeded in order to assume that Ragnall and Lothbrokwere the esame person, assuming that they existed at all. In orderforthis to be the case, we must make thhe followingassumptions:(1) We must assume that Adam of Bremen (lateeleventh century) wascorrectect in giving “Lodparchus” (i.e.,Lothbrok) as the name of thefather of Ivar (late ninthcentury).((2) We must assume that the “Coghad Gaedhel reGallaibh” (“The War ofthe Gaedhil with the Gaill”, “, ed. byTodd, London, 1867), a twelfthcentury Irish source, is correctin stating that Halfdan off Dublin(killed in Ireland in 877,according to the Annals of Ulster) was theson of a certainRagnanall, and that this Ragnall was the same as theRagnall whoappears in the Fragmentary Annals of Ireeland.(3) We mustassume that the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is correct instating thata brother (unnamnamed, but called Ubbe in later sources)ofHalfdan and Ivar was killed in England in 878, despitetthecontradictory testimony of Aethelweard which gives a verydifferentreading for the same event (s(see 4).(4) We mustassume that the chronicle of Aethelweard is wrong instating thatHalfdan brothother of Ivar was killed in England in 878,forotherwise that would prove that Halfdan of Dublin (dd. 877 inIreland)was a different person from Halfdan brother of Ivar.(5)In addition to assuming ng that Halfdan of Dublin was thesameperson as Halfdan brother of Ivar, we must also assume thattthis Ivarwas the same person as Adam of Bremen’s Ivar, keepingin mind thatAethelweard’s chronicle,e, if correct, would implythe existence of twoIvars in the British isles at this time.(6)We mustust assume that the philological argument makingLothbrok(a)a feminine name is incorrect.(7) If Ar Ari, theearliest author to mention Ragnar Lothbrok, is to beconsidered areliable source on this matter, then we must also assumethatHalfdan of Dublin was the same person as the Halfdan brotherofSigifrid who appears in the Annals of Fulda for the year 873,despitethe severe chronological prproblems which that wouldcause with Ari’sgenealogies.Of the above assumptions, numbers(1) throughugh (6) are crucial if onewishes to argue thatRagnall and Lothbrok were the same, and (7) isneededed also ifit is to be assumed that the information given by Ariisaccurate. Given the noncontempoorary nature of the first twoitems,along with the contradictions present some of the others,theree is avery small chance that all six of the crucialassumptions are correct.However, if any one of f the first sixitems is false, then the case forRagnall being the same asLothbrok collapses, and we must concludethat the “RagnallLothbrok” attempt for a historical Ragnar Lothbrokisunsatisfactctory. [Note: See R. W. McTurk’s article”RagnarrLothbrok in the Irish Annals?” (Proceedings of ttheSeventh VikingCongress, 1976, pp. 93-123), where a different,but much more rigid,list of the s same type isgiven.]CONCLUSIONSSince all of the above attempts to find ahistorical Ragnar Lothbrohbrokfail to satisfy the mentionedcriteria, Lothbrok and Ragnall come fromnoncontemporary sourcess which are themselves open to suspicion, andthe historicalrecords show nobody else (as far as I kknow) who couldbeplausibly identified with Ragnar Lothbrok, it must beconcludedthat Ragnar Lothbrbrok is not historical according tothe termsdescribed above. In fact, if there is any historicalbasis to RagnarLothbrok legend, it is quite likely that RagnarLothbrok is the resultof combining g two or more distinctindividuals into a single characterhaving the attributes ofboth, in much thhe same way as RagnarLothbrok’s legendary”father” Sigurd Ring is in fact a composite oftwo differerentmen who fought against each other for the Danish thronein theyear 814, Sigifridus (“Sigurd”) and Anulo (of which “Ring” isatranslation of Latin “Annulus”). However, such compositecharacterrscannot be considered as historical, and there is noevidence whichcomes close to being contemporarary which showsthat either Lothbrok orRagnall existed.FURTHER READINGThe mostambitious attempt tmpt to portray Ragnar Lothbrok as ahistoricalfigure is “Scandinavian Kings in the British Isles8550-880” by AlfredP. Smyth (Oxford University Press, 1977). Fora very criticalexamination of Smythth’s views, see “High-kings,Vikings and otherkings”, by Donnchadh O’ Corrain, in IrishHistorical Review, vol 21(1979), pp. 283-323 (very highlyrecommended). Both of these sourcescite numerous o otherrelevant sources for those who are interested infurtherdetails.[Note: The usual apologiesies if my transliterationsfrom the Old Norsealphabet into the alphabet available to me isa bit slloppy.]Stewart Baldwin.

  1. Change Date: 1 APR 1999

Father: Sigurd I “Ring” b: ABT 0710 in Denmark

Mother: Alfhild b: ABT 0714 in Alfheim, Norway

Marriage 1 Aslaug of Denmark SIGURDSDOTTIR b: ABT 0755 in Denmark

Children

1. Has Children Sigurd II Snodoye (or Eric II) RAGNARSSON King of Denmark b: ABT 0782 in Denmark

2. Has Children Alof RAGNARSDOTTIR

3. Has Children Ivar “the Boneless” RAGNARSSON King of Dublin

4. Has No Children Halfdan RAGNARSSON

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Flourished in the 9th century, was a Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar’s murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar’s death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo’s legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar’s death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands’ poem Háttalykill.2

Note* Other children given by Hull are: (1) female, Ragnhildir: (2) Ragnarsdottir, Alof and (3)Ragnarsson, Ubbe. He may have had a wife named Thora who MAY have been the mother of Alof.

Bjørn Ironside certainly played an important role in France. His father Ragnar Lodbrok can be identified in contemporary Frankish annals with his nickname Lodbrok translated to Hoseri (in German language Hosen), meaning fur or leather breeches. Variations are Ogier and Oschery. He operated from the Seine to the border of Spain from 840 to 851. He conquered Aquitania from the Franks, and he used Bordeaux as his stronghold for years. This conquer, one out of more, included Poitou, which in the sagas is called Peita. Saxo is saying Petiæ and that Ragnar conquered Petiæ. this is confirmed in annals. This is the district in the Loire area. In Western Europe his sons are more reported. Ragnar Lodbrok himself were operating more in East Eur

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Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Ragnar Lodbrok (Ragnar “Hairy-Breeks”, Old Norse: Ragnarr Loðbrók) was a Norse legendary hero from the Viking Age who was thoroughly reshaped in Old Norse poetry and legendary sagas.

Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865.[citation needed] Neither really matches with what is known of him, though he may perhaps have held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

A historic Ragnar Lodbrok is held to have been an earl at the court of the Danish king Horik I (814-854), and this Ragnar participated in the Viking plunderings of Paris in 845.

A certain Reginheri attacked Paris with a fleet of 120 ships. The warriors belonging to the army of Charles the Bald, were placed to guard the monastery in St. Denis, but fled when the Danish Vikings executed their prisoners ferociously in front of their eyes.

After receiving a tribute of 7000 pounds of silver from Charles the Bald, Ragnar went back. By mysterious circumstances, many men in Ragnar’s army died during the journey and Ragnar died soon after his return.

Ragnar apparently spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. One of his favorite tactics was to attack Christian cities on church feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving.

But as the extent of his supposed realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader. By 845, he was a powerful man and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that would outshine his own achievements.

It was in 845 that he is said to have sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in what is now France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish Empire was then known. Rouen was ravaged and then Carolivenna, a mere 20 km from St. Denis. The raiders then attacked and captured Paris. The traditional date for this is 28 March, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by certain followers of the Asatru religion.

The King of West Francia, Charlemagne’s grandson Charles the Bald, paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

Later, Ragnar’s sons were to return for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for “Northmen”, as the Franks called the Scandinavians or the Nordmenn as the Norwegians called themselves (which is much more likely).

After he was done with France, and after his supposed death in 845, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the north-east coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle II of Northumbria.

Aelle’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he is alleged to have exclaimed “How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!”, referring to the vengeance he hoped his sons would wreak when they heard of his death.

Alternative versions of the story say that he landed by accident in East Anglia and there befriended King Edmund before being killed by a jealous courtier. The murderer escaped to Denmark and blamed Edmund for Lodbrok’s demise.

As he was thrown into the snake pit, Ragnar was said to have uttered his famous death song: “It gladdens me to know that Balder’s father makes ready the benches for a banquet. Soon we shall be drinking ale from the curved horns. The champion who comes into Odin’s dwelling does not lament his death. I shall not enter his hall with words of fear upon my lips. The Æsir will welcome me. Death comes without lamenting… Eager am I to depart. The Dísir summon me home, those whom Odin sends for me from the halls of the Lord of Hosts. Gladly shall I drink ale in the high-seat with the Æsir. The days of my life are ended. I laugh as I die.”

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing tafl, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Although these stories may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. His other sons, Ivar the Boneless (alias Hingwar) and Ubbe soon learned the details of their father’s death and swore that they would avenge his killing, in time-honoured Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar and Ubbe crossed the North Sea with a large army (The Great Heathen Army), sacked York, met King Aelle in battle, and captured him. He was sentenced to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn (Blood eagle), an exceedingly painful death.

They then moved south to East Anglia, on the way attacking the monasteries of Bardney, Croyland and Medeshampstede where, according to tradition, their army slew 80 monks. Eventually they captured King Edmund and had him shot by archers and beheaded. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the Danes a generation later.

He was said at one point to be married to the infamous Viking pirate Lathgertha.

——————–

Född 765 i Uppsala. Död 845 i England.

http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

http://lind.no/nor/index.asp?lang=gb&emne=asatru&person=Ragnar%20Lodbrok&list=&vis=

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Ragnar Sigurdsson – also known as: Lodbrok – was born about 0765 in Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden and died in 0845 in England . He was the son of King Sigrud Randversson and Alfhild Gandolfsdatter.

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsatter about 0763 while living in Denmark. Aslaug was born about 0765, lived in Denmark. She is the daughter of Sigrud “Fafnisbana” Sigmundsson and Brunhild Budlasdatter.

Children:

i. Sigurd “Snake-Eye” Ragnarsson was born about 0786 in Denmark. See #5. below.

ii. Bjorn Ragarsson was born about 0777 in Denmark.

——————–

Flourished in the 9th century

Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar’s murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar’s death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo’s legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar’s death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands’ poem Háttalykill.

____________________________________

Ragnarr Loðbrók or Ragnar Lodbrok was a semi-legendary King of Denmark and Sweden who reigned sometime in the eighth or ninth centuries. Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865. Neither matches with what we know of him, and he probably held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

Life

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Raids

He spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving. But as the extent of his realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader.

France

By 845, he was a powerful ruler, and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that outshined his own achievements.

In that year, he sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in modern France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish empire was then known.

Also in 845, Paris was captured and held ransom by a Viking raider, whom the sagas say was Ragnar Lodbrok. The traditional date for this is March 28, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by many Scandinavians. The King of West Francia, Charlemagne’s son Charles II “The Bald”, paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

England

After he was done with France, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the northeast coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle of Northumbria. Ella’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he was alleged to have exclaimed “How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!”

Legacy

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing chess, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Ragnar’s fourth son, Ivar the Boneless soon learned the details of his father’s death and swore that he would avenge his father’s killing, in time-honored Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar crossed the North Sea with a large army, met King Ella in battle, and captured him. He sentenced him to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn, an exceedingly painful death. Although this story may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. Ivor was the mastermind behind the attacks on the English mainland in the final quarter of the ninth century. He invaded East Anglia, and the following year attacked York. He was aided by the internal struggle for power in Northumbria—which he was of course responsible for by killing Ella. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the “Danes” a generation later.

Meanwhile, in France, the Vikings kept coming back for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for “Northmen”, as the Franks called the Vikings).

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsdottir, daughter of Sigurd Wolsung and Unknown

1 Encyclopædia Britannica Online, “Ragnar Lothbrok ” .

2 Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/ ).

3 Brian C. Tompsett , Register över Royal genealogiska ( Datahttp : / / http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk / public / Släktforskning / royal / catalog.html

Brian Tompsett

Institutionen för datavetenskap

University of Hull

Hull , Storbritannien, HU6 7RX

BCTompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk ), se Snorre saga och den isländska Landnamobok ( Book of Settlment ).

——————–

Marriage: Aslaug Sigurdsdottir

Died: Cir 865

Flourished in the 9th century

Viking whose life passed into legend in medieval European literature.

In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Ragnar was said to be the father of three sons, Halfdan, Inwaer (Ivar the Boneless), and Hubba (Ubbe), who led a Viking invasion of East Anglia in 865 seeking to avenge Ragnar’s murder. In the European literature of the several centuries following Ragnar’s death, his name is surrounded with considerable legend. In the Gesta Danorum (c. 1185) of the Danish historian Saxo Grammaticus, he was a 9th-century Danish king whose campaigns included a battle with the Holy Roman emperor Charlemagne. According to Saxo’s legendary history, Ragnar was eventually captured by the Anglo-Saxon king Aella of Northumbria and thrown into a snake pit to die. This story is also recounted in the later Icelandic works Ragnars saga lodbrókar and Tháttr af Ragnarssonum. The 12th-century Icelandic poem Krákumál provides a romanticized description of Ragnar’s death and links him in marriage with a daughter of Sigurd (Siegfried) and Brynhild (Brunhild), figures from the heroic literature of the ancient Teutons. The actions of Ragnar and his sons are also recounted in the Orkney Islands’ poem Háttalykill.

____________________________________

Ragnarr Loðbrók or Ragnar Lodbrok was a semi-legendary King of Denmark and Sweden who reigned sometime in the eighth or ninth centuries. Although he is something of a hero in his native Scandinavia, reliable accounts of his life are very sketchy and heavily based on ancient Viking sagas. Even the dating of his reign is not certain; there are sources that date it from 750–794, and others from 860–865. Neither matches with what we know of him, and he probably held power as a warlord from approximately 835 to his death in 865, perhaps only being recognized as king in the last five years of his life.

Life

Ragnar was a pagan who claimed to be a direct descendant of the god Odin. One of his favorite strategies was to attack Christian cities on holy feast days, knowing that many soldiers would be in church.

Raids

He spent most of his life as a pirate and raider, invading one country after another. He would generally accept a huge payment to leave his victims alone, only to come back later and demand more riches in exchange for leaving. But as the extent of his realm shows, he was also a gifted military leader.

France

By 845, he was a powerful ruler, and most likely a contemporary of the first ruler of Russia, the Viking Rurik. It is said he was always seeking new adventures because he was worried that his freebooting sons would do things that outshined his own achievements.

In that year, he sailed southward, looking for new worlds to conquer. With 120 ships and 5,000 Viking warriors, he landed in modern France, probably at the Seine estuary, and ravaged West Francia, as the westernmost part of the Frankish empire was then known.

Also in 845, Paris was captured and held ransom by a Viking raider, whom the sagas say was Ragnar Lodbrok. The traditional date for this is March 28, which is today referred to as Ragnar Lodbrok Day by many Scandinavians. The King of West Francia, Charlemagne’s son Charles II “The Bald”, paid him a fantastic amount of money not to destroy the city. Ragnar Lodbrok, according to Viking sources, was satisfied with no less than 7,000 pounds of silver in exchange for sparing the city. However, that did not stop Ragnar from attacking other parts of France, and it took a long time for the Franks to drive him out.

England

After he was done with France, he turned his attention to England. In 865, he landed in Northumbria on the northeast coast of England. It is claimed that here he was defeated in battle for the only time, by King Aelle of Northumbria. Ella’s men captured Ragnar, and the King ordered him thrown into a pit filled with poisonous snakes. As he was slowly being bitten to death, he was alleged to have exclaimed “How the little pigs would grunt if they knew the situation of the old boar!”

Legacy

One Viking saga states that when his four sons heard the manner of his death, they all reacted in great sorrow. Hvitserk, who was playing chess, gripped the piece so hard that he bled from his fingernails. Björn Ironside grabbed a spear so tightly that he left an impression in it, and Sigurd Snake-Eye, who was trimming his nails, cut straight through to the bone.

Ragnar’s fourth son, Ivar the Boneless soon learned the details of his father’s death and swore that he would avenge his father’s killing, in time-honored Viking tradition. In 866, Ivar crossed the North Sea with a large army, met King Ella in battle, and captured him. He sentenced him to die according to the custom of Rista Blodörn, an exceedingly painful death. Although this story may not be accurate, like virtually all tales concerning Ragnar Lodbrok, his death had serious consequences. Ivor was the mastermind behind the attacks on the English mainland in the final quarter of the ninth century. He invaded East Anglia, and the following year attacked York. He was aided by the internal struggle for power in Northumbria—which he was of course responsible for by killing Ella. These wars were a prelude to the long struggle of the Saxons of Alfred the Great against the “Danes” a generation later.

Meanwhile, in France, the Vikings kept coming back for more booty. Among their feats was destroying the city of Rouen several times. Ultimately, many of them settled there permanently, in a land that became known as Normandy (for “Northmen”, as the Franks called the Vikings).

Ragnar married Aslaug Sigurdsdottir, daughter of Sigurd Wolsung and Unknown.


Sources

———————————————————————–

1 Encyclopædia Britannica Online, “Ragnar Lothbrok”.

2 Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/).

3 Brian C. Tompsett, Directory of Royal Genealogical (Datahttp://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk/public/genealogy/royal/catalog.html

Brian Tompsett

Department of Computer Science

University of Hull

Hull, UK, HU6 7RX

B.C.Tompsett@dcs.hull.ac.uk), See Snorre’s Saga and the Icelandic Landnamobok (Book of Settlment).

Smyth, Alfred P.: Scandinavian Kings in the British Isles 850-880, Oxford University Press, 1977

O’ Corrain, Donnchadh: «High-kings, Vikings and other kings», i Irish Historical Review, vol 21 (1979), sidene 283-323

Humble, Richard: The Fall of Saxon England, (BCA) 1995

Jones, Gwyn: A History of the Vikings, 1983

Eksterne lenker

Was Ragnar Lothbrok historical?

Fornaldarsögur Norðurlanda fra «Kulturformidlingen Norrøne Tekster og Kvad».

Sagaen om Ragnarsønnene i engelsk oversettelse av Tunstall på Northvegr

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Ragnar Lodbrok omtales som sagnkonge, det finnes ei egen soge om ham. Hn var konge rundt Oslofjorden, på Romerike og i Vestfold helt til Langesundfjorden. Han var ofså konge i Danmark

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Reference: http://familytrees.genopro.com/318186/jarleslekt/default.htm?page=toc_families.htm

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http://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ragnar_Lodbrok

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Bild: Aella mördar Ragnar Lodbrok

Rag ——————– Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Hull, England aka: King Ragnar Lodbrok of Denmark at Lethra (Succeeding his father, Sigurd Ring. )(1

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Ragnar “Lodbrok” Sigurdsson’s Timeline

695

Birth of Sward III de Jutlandia

750

Birth of Sigfred 2. RAGNARSEN

765

Birth of Ragnar

Uppsala, Sweden

765

Marriage of Ragnar Sigurdsson to Aslaug Sigurdsdatter

Uppsala Svitjod

765

christened on 765

Uppsala Sweden

773

Age 8

Marriage of

775

Age 10

Birth of Ivar “The Boneless”, King of Dublin

Möre, Romsdal, Norway

779

Age 14

Birth of Dtr of King Ragnar of Skjoldung

784

Age 19

Birth of Ragnhild Ragnarsdottir

786

Age 21

Birth of Rognvald Ragnarsson

Denmark

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